Saturday, 18 November 2017

A Re-roofed Tower

Three years ago we took a photo of roofers at work in Montresor.

In September  I remembered to take a photo of the completed work. The delay is mine, not theirs....


Friday, 17 November 2017

Trains, Planes and...

...hopefully automobiles.

This is what today should look like for us. We're out the door before midday, heading towards Australia. We arrive Sunday afternoon local time, but before that I have arranged a little excursion.



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Just a quick reminder about the Loire Valley Time Travel gift store. We are quite proud of the designs, and we like the t-shirts we have received so far. We will be wearing them in Australia, hopefully to admiring looks. The cups look great, but we have 3 households' of coffee cups here so haven't ordered any - yet. Someone may get a cup for Christmas. Check out (and make sure you use) the discount codes - they always seem to have at least one set of discounts happening.


Thursday, 16 November 2017

Meringues

It's been ages since we featured a peek in a boulangerie window, so here we go!


The meringues were in a boulangerie in rue Daguerre, on the corner of where we stayed in Paris last time. Didn't try any - saw them too late and would have exploded if any more food had been taken on. Still - we know where they are...

(And yes, like most French meringues, they are the size of a baby's head).

Wednesday, 15 November 2017

A Wired Tree

I have no idea what this is about - I noticed this tree (in the grounds of Chateau Cheverny) in September, but couldn't work out what the wire was for, where it went, or what it was feeding. It may even be that what you see is all there is, which adds to the mystery.


Tuesday, 14 November 2017

What is and what should never be

Modern science is pretty amazing, allowing things to happen that even 20 years ago would have been almost impossible. One of the fields where this is the case is architecture, where modern design technology has allowed designers to make a break from simple squares. Looking at some of the results I wonder if this is a good thing - will these be future classics, or a case of "just because you can doesn't mean you should"?




The first two photos are in La Defense, Paris. It's the edge of town repository for strange shaped wind funnels that allows inner Paris to stay attractive. It's also the home of one of the most outrageously overpriced views in Paris: 19€ for an escalator ride strikes me as being 10 euros too much (and even then I probably wouldn't...).

The third photo is the new Fondation Louis Vuitton. Once you realise it's just a couple of concrete boxes with bits of glass hanging off it in a not terribly attractive way, it's more "meh" than "wow".

*not my own title

Monday, 13 November 2017

What Happened to All Those Messages?


In late October I was whiling away the time at the ophthalmologists, reading a copy of Grazia from November 2016. Inside, the article that really caught my attention was a two page spread about saving all the thousands of messages and tributes that had been left by people at the sites of the terrorist attacks in Paris twelve months earlier. I was fascinated and moved so I thought I'd pass on the story via the blog.

Today in the Archives de Paris there are two shelves which are home to the 7689 documents that they collected from the streets after the attacks on 13 November 2015. This collection was the brainchild of a man called Gérôme Truc. He felt it would allow historians and sociologists to have access to another dimension of the event ie how ordinary individuals experience these things and respond to them.

Place de la République.

The documents come from the Bataclan, la Belle Equipe, the Café Bonne Bière, Casa Nostra, the Carillon, the Petit Cambodge and the Comptoir Voltaire. Ten volunteers collected the messages of love from Parisians, French people and foreigners, bit by bit from 17 November.

In addition two archivists and a conservator made 17 visits to the sites. According to them the most affecting was visiting the Bonne Bière because there was a message found there from an intensive care doctor, who apologised for being unable to save a young man.

Tributes outside the Charlie Hebdo offices.

The archive staff assessed the condition of the messages, children's drawings and poems. The main problem was plastic pockets. They were useless because the rain quickly got into them and turned the contents to mush.

Back at the Archives, the documents were dried in two sorting rooms. Usually overnight was enough to dry them out. They were then sent to be fumigated to kill mould and other fungi before being left for three weeks to stabilise. Once returned to the Archives, the documents, from metro tickets to A3 in size, were dusted with a microfibre cloth then sorted by place and date before being digitised (thanks to a donation by Arkhênum).

 Tributes in Boulevard Richard Lenoir after the Charlie Hebdo attack.

The archivists didn't look at the documents. They had no time and they needed to maintain a certain distance emotionally. While they worked the tried to be calm and converse normally, even crack jokes.

The Museum of Paris, Carnavalet, conserved all the objects (soft toys, guitars, flags...) but those that didn't carry a meaningful message were thrown away. There was a debate about what to do with the wilted flowers. Gerôme Truc suggested that like in London in 2005, the flowers should be collected, composted and a tree planted in the compost.

 Tributes left in Boulevard Richard Lenoir after the Charlie Hebdo attack.

A hundred and fifty documents were recovered from the temporary memorial in the Place de la République. The rest of the messages from this spot were kept by the collective known as 17 Plus Jamais, created the day after the Charlie Hebdo attack in January 2015.

At the time of the Charlie Hebdo attacks the archival work was not able to be applied to the messages to the murdered cartoonists and they were deposited at various sites. At the time the Mairie de Paris just didn't think of preserving and cataloguing them. Eventually Harvard University launched an appeal to collect the messages after the event, and many of them are now in the US.

 The Bataclan.

The Nice attack happened just after the Archives had finished their digitising project, but despite calls from those involved, the Mairie de Nice did not initiate a similar project and the messages were not collected there.

You can see some of documents on the Paris.fr website, and 900 of the messages were published by Michel Lafon in Je suis Paris.